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New Exhibit feature! #idoSTEMbecause

New Exhibit Feature! The DoSeum's #idoSTEMbecause Wall in Innovation Station promotes early engagement in STEM across the world!

The DoSeum is excited to unveil the newest interactive space in Innovation Station, the #idoSTEMbecause wall in Innovation Station. Visitors can go to the wall, write out their reason for doing STEM, and then post their photo on social media with the hashtags #idoSTEMbecause and #thedoseum. You can also tag us @thedoseum for the chance to be reposted! 

Read more about the movement below with guest post from Vanessa Westbrook, The DoSeum's STEM Education Manager:

As The DoSeum promotes the STEM education movement that is being addressed across the nation, young guests who visit this innovative museum are able to engage in a diverse range of learning experiences. The acronym STEM that stands for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics was emphasized by the National Science Foundation (NSF) in the early 2000s. As opposed to standing alone, these courses are combined and integrated into new cross-disciplinary courses to provide students with a chance to study and understand the various paths that connect the world they live in, rather than trying to learn about single pieces of knowledge.

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"However, more research from NSF’s funded projects is reporting that it is never too early to promote students’ interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics."

The engagement with STEM is proving to be very practical at the elementary student’s level. Previously, experts believed that mainly high school students would benefit from the integration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics; however, more research from NSF’s funded projects is reporting that it is never too early to promote students’ interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. In fact, elementary years have proven to be the time period when children develop interest in STEM subjects, careers, and an array of interested projects.

Remember the age old question, “What do you want to be when you grow up”? The DoSeum would like take another spin on that question. Why do you do STEM? This question addresses how we prepare for a career, and what is needed to have such a career, i.e. skills and knowledge. As children who visit The DoSeum and children across the United States prepare for the workplace of tomorrow, they do not have any idea what type of careers will be available in ten years, twenty years, or more, but they can be prepared to design, test, problem solve, and use critical thinking skills!

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"As children who visit The DoSeum and children across the United States prepare for the workplace of tomorrow, they do not have any idea what type of careers will be available in ten years, twenty years, or more, but they can be prepared to design, test, problem solve, and use critical thinking skills!"

We at The DoSeum intend to make building such skills fun. Join our hashtag as we go global in sharing kids in San Antonio, the great state of Texas, the United States, and the world who think about STEM. #idoSTEMbecause is the question we pose to get kids thinking about learning now and how to prepare for whatever careers and opportunities come in the future.

Join us at #idoSTEMbecause

[caption id="attachment_2654" align="aligncenter" width="1024"]20151001_151708 Vanessa Westbrook (vwestbrook@thedoseum.org) is the STEM Education Manager at The DoSeum: San Antonio Museum for Kids. As a 30+ veteran in the education and science areas, Westbrook has provided instruction at P-16 level and other professional services to agencies, organizations and school districts across North and South America[/caption]

 

References

National Research Council. (2007). Taking science to school: Learning and teaching science in grades K–8. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council (NRC). 2011. A framework for K–12 science education: Practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

NGSS Lead States. 2013. Next Generation Science Standards: For states, by states. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

Posted by Miranda Clark at 10:31 PM
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